The Argument for Music Education

Musical experience early in life imparts lifelong neuroplasticity.

The argument for early music education takes three general forms. Music boosts brain and cognitive function important for learning, which in turn facilitates success in school. Music training improves educational outcomes, such as graduation rates. And there are also less tangible benefits of music education, such as improved focus, discipline, confidence and even friendships.

https://northwestern.app.box.com/s/evxw053dl2rwdgv34qsqt0glrf3qnoqd

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A randomized control trial of interventions in school-aged children with auditory processing disorders

Auditory training, language and phonological therapies, and remote microphone hearing aid systems are beneficial for children with APD.

Sharma, M., Purdy, S. C., & Kelly, A. S. (2012). A randomized control trial of interventions in school-aged children with auditory processing disorders. International journal of audiology, 51(7), 506-518.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/14992027.2012.670272

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Evidence of benefits following ARIA auditory training for children and adolescents diagnosed with amblyaudia

The purpose of this study (which included participants from SoundSkills APD Clinic) was to demonstrate the efficacy of Auditory Rehabilitation for Interaural Asymmetry (ARIA) to improve dichotic listening scores in children and adolescents diagnosed with amblyaudia and other binaural integration deficits.

Moncrieff, D., Keith, W., Abramson, M., & Swann, A. (2017). Evidence of binaural integration benefits following ARIA training for children and adolescents diagnosed with amblyaudia. International Journal of Audiology, 56(8), 580-588.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14992027.2017.1303199

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Assistive and therapeutic effects of remote microphone hearing aid systems for children with auditory processing disorders

One of the most exciting research findings in the treatment of auditory processing disorder (APD) is the neuroplastic benefit of amplification. It is now well established that, over time, amplification with remote microphone hearing aid systems results in improvements in hearing skills of children with APD due to beneficial neuroplastic changes in the brain.

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Remote microphone hearing aid systems assist children with autism spectrum disorder

This article is one among a growing body of research showing the benefits of auditory training and remote microphone hearing aid systems for children and adolescents with ASD.

Schafer, E. C., Wright, S., Anderson, C., Jones, J., Pitts, K., Bryant, D., … & Reed, M. P. (2016). Assistive technology evaluations: Remote-microphone technology for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of communication disorders, 64, 1-17.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0021992416301009

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Children diagnosed with auditory processing disorder and their parents: a qualitative study about perceptions of living with APD

The aim of this study by Sarah Lawton, speech-language therapist at SoundSkills APD Clinic, was to explore the emotional and psychological consequences of living with APD as perceived by children with the disorder and their parents.

Lawton, S., Purdy, S. C., & Kalathottukaren, R. T. (2017). Children diagnosed with auditory processing disorder and their parents: a qualitative study about perceptions of living with APD. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 28(7), 610-624.

Background: Negative psychosocial consequences have been reported for children with auditory processing disorder (APD). The current literature surrounding APD does not sufficiently address the emotional and psychological consequences of living with the disorder. It is recommended that data be collected from multiple sources, including the child living with APD. Subjective reports of the perceptions of children with APD and their families have real-life validity and can inform clinical decisions and guide future research.

Purpose: The aims of this study were to explore the psychosocial consequences of APD as perceived by children with the disorder and their parents.
Research Design: Qualitative cross-sectional study.
Study Sample: Thirteen participants were interviewed: six children with APD, aged 10–12 yr, and one parent for each child (in one case, two parents participated in the interview).
Data Collection and Analysis: Semi structured interviews were used to examine the social, emotional, and educational well-being of children with APD. Inductive thematic analysis was conducted to develop themes that illustrated the experiences of living with APD.

Results: Three themes were identified forming a causal network conceptual framework that is reciprocal in nature: (1) external factors, (2) internal problems, and (3) coping. The themes revealed how APD impacted negatively on children’s psychosocial well-being (internal problems: covert thoughts, overt behaviors) and described the basis for these outcomes (external factors: environmentally based problems, dissatisfaction with support) and the ability of children and their parent(s) to manage the impact of APD (coping: positive, negative).

Conclusions: The three themes identified in this research provide a novel understanding of the experience of APD. The themes reflect the psychosocial consequences of external factors that are created internally through ‘‘thought’’ and expressed externally through ‘‘behaviour.’’ Pathways to support positive coping strategies while discouraging negative coping strategies will enable children to overcome problems and improve their psychosocial well-being.

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A European perspective on auditory processing disorder – current knowledge and future research focus

This consensus statement on auditory processing disorder (APD) by experts on APD from 17 European countries was led by Professors Vivian Iliadou (Greece) and Doris Eva-Bamiou (UK).

Iliadou, V. V., Ptok, M., Grech, H., Pedersen, E. R., Brechmann, A., Deggouj, N., … & Veuillet, E. (2017). A European perspective on auditory processing disorder-current knowledge and future research focus. Frontiers in neurology, 8, 622.

Current notions of “hearing impairment,” as reflected in clinical audiological practice, do not acknowledge the needs of individuals who have normal hearing pure tone sensitivity but who experience auditory processing difficulties in everyday life that are indexed by reduced performance in other more sophisticated audiometric tests such as speech audiometry in noise or complex non-speech sound perception. This disorder, defined as “Auditory Processing Disorder” (APD) or “Central Auditory Processing Disorder” is classified in the current tenth version of the International Classification of diseases as H93.25 and in the forthcoming beta eleventh version. APDs may have detrimental effects on the affected individual, with low esteem, anxiety, and depression, and symptoms may remain into adulthood. These disorders may interfere with learning per se and with communication, social, emotional, and academic-work aspects of life. The objective of the present paper is to define a baseline European APD consensus formulated by experienced clinicians and researchers in this specific field of human auditory science. A secondary aim is to identify issues that future research needs to address in order to further clarify the nature of APD and thus assist in optimum diagnosis and evidence-based management. This European consensus presents the main symptoms, conditions, and specific medical history elements that should lead to auditory processing evaluation. Consensus on definition of the disorder, optimum diagnostic pathway, and appropriate management are highlighted alongside a perspective on future research focus.

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Remote microphone hearing aid systems drive beneficial neuroplastic change in the auditory systems of children with dyslexia and associated auditory processing weaknesses

This study provides strong evidence of beneficial neuroplastic change, measured through improvements in the electrophysiological responses of the brain to speech sounds, in children with auditory processing deficits, as a result of use of mild amplification with remote microphone hearing aid systems.

Hornickel, J., Zecker, S. G., Bradlow, A. R., & Kraus, N. (2012). Assistive listening devices drive neuroplasticity in children with dyslexia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109(41), 16731-16736.

https://www.pnas.org/content/109/41/16731.short

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